Controversial Sides – Sources

October 4, 2011 at 2:40 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Does age matter in a relationship?

No

http://www.notjustthekitchen.com/family-relationships/does-age-matter/

http://www.keen.com/documents/works/articles/love/does-age-difference-matter-in-love.asp

http://www.helium.com/items/937591-does-age-matter-in-a-relationship

http://health.ninemsn.com.au/sex/relationships/691136/mind-the-gap (somewhat both sides)

http://www.marriagemissions.com/age-gap-should-it-matter/

Yes

http://jdmurrah.hubpages.com/hub/Does-Age-Matter-in-Relationships

http://lifestyle.msn.com/relationships/article.aspx?cp-documentid=20703148

http://www.helium.com/items/937591-does-age-matter-in-a-relationship

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/sep/12/age-difference-dr-luisa-dillner

http://shine.yahoo.com/channel/sex/does-age-matter-in-relationships-1232384 (somewhat both sides)

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Common Knowledge

September 29, 2011 at 2:44 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

I think obesity is common knowledge.  I think alot of people are aware of the risks and rise of obesity.  People are aware of the causes of obesity and are aware of all of the fast food restaurants that lore us into buying fatty foods.  People are also aware of how lazy America is getting.  Some people may not want to accept the fact that they can do something about their obesity, but all in all, alot of people are aware if the rise in obesity in America.

Paper 1 – Draft 2 (Childhood Obesity)

September 25, 2011 at 11:58 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

 

Childhood Obesity: How did it come about?

 

                In my junior year of high school, I was sitting in my health class staring off into space when my teacher told us that we were going to start a movie.  At that second I came back from cloud nine and was excited to watch a movie instead of listen to her lecture.  The movie she put in was called “Supersize Me”.  After the video was finished, I had a new outlook on obesity.  After watching that movie, I started asking questions about obesity; how did it start? Why has it been such a problem?  Then, I started thinking about how children could become obese and how this “epidemic” of childhood obesity came about.  Childhood obesity is defined as children who have an excess amount of fat.  More and more children are consuming more calories than they are burning off.  Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the past 30 years.  About 17% (12.5 million) of children and adolescents (between the ages of 2-19) are obese in America. The obesity rate among children between the ages of six and 11 has increased from 6.5% in 1980 to 19.6% in 2008 and the rate among adolescents between the ages of 12 to 19 has increased from 5.0% to 18.1%.  These rates have increased by exactly 13.1% in 28 years!   These large increasing statistics have brought the attention of many individuals to realize that childhood obesity is a serious problem and that the numbers keep rising.  With these increasing numbers, I can’t help but ask why and what happened since the 1980’s that have caused this significant increase in childhood obesity rates.

                Since the late 1900’s, childhood obesity rates have dramatically increased and scientists, dieticians, and many other people can’t help but wonder why in that specific time period did rates start to increase. There are many causes of children who are obese.  One cause that some children cannot fix is that obesity is genetic.  Although obesity can be genetic, it is very rare that certain genes link obesity from the parents to their own children.  Only about one in 7,000 children can say that they are obese because of their genes.  Those few children who can say they are obese because of genetics are said to have a disorder, such as Bardet-Biedl or Prader-Willi syndrome.  Both of these disorders are caused by the variation or depletion of certain genes in certain chromosomes and one of the effects of these syndromes is obesity.  These syndromes are hereditary and will be passed on from generation to generation. 

Other than genetics, the question still arises about why childhood obesity has increased so much since the late 1900’s.  One answer to this question is because of the great invention of the television – which, nowadays, some people think rule their lives.  TV became very popular in the 1960’s because more channels were created that contained news, sports, sitcoms, and much more.  Although TV’s became popular in the 1960’s, they were quite expensive during that era.  A decade or so later, TV’s became less expensive and more people started to buy them.  With almost everyone having TV’s in the 1980’s, more and more children became less active because all they wanted to do was sit and watch TV with their friends.  Less activity leads to fewer calories burned, which is turn could cause obesity among children.  Other technology devices such as computers, video games, Xbox’s, and cell phones all can contribute to the increase in obesity.  More children are becoming attached to computers, games on computers, all sorts of video games, and cell phones which leads to less activity every day.  Not only is a decrease in activity a huge part of childhood obesity, but the rise in high caloric foods is also a major attribution. Many fast food restaurants were booming in the 1980’s and have grown ever since.  In the late 1900’s, fast food restaurants were competing between each other (this was known as the “burger wars”) and they all started to increase their locations and lower the prices on their menus so more people would come to their restaurant, instead of going to other fast food restaurants.  Fast food restaurants also enlarged their portion sizes, so people would consume more calories each meal.  In addition to the escalation of caloric intake, there are many other factors that contribute to the rise of obesity since the late 1900’s.

Culture and society have a large part in childhood obesity. Throughout the past 30 years, women have become a huge asset in the work force.  Nowadays, with most families having a working mother and father, there is limited time to prepare dinner for the family and it has become easier to just go out to eat or to go through a drive-through on the way home from work.  In other words, non-healthy foods are the easy way to feed a family.  Not only do some parents not have time to prepare meals, healthy food prices have gone up as the prices for non-healthy foods have gone down.  Some parents cannot afford to give their children the healthy foods and nutrients they need, which could result in the increase in weight, and possibly obesity.  Another cultural aspect of childhood obesity is schools and education.  Since the late 1900’s, more schools have focused mostly on academics instead of physical activity.  Schools have decreased their physical education and health classes and exchanged them for more reading or math classes.  Since the 1980’s, there have been many changes in society, some for the good and some the bad, and some of these changes have an influence on children and how they take care of their bodies.  As society continues to become more advanced, there will be a continuing number of children who are becoming obese.  After discussing many factors that have caused an increase in childhood obesity since the late 1900’s, we can’t help but ask where childhood obesity has been a problem in the United States.

Currently, out of the top 28 countries in the world, the United States is first with the highest percentage of children who are obese.  The United States is followed by Mexico, and in third is the United Kingdom.  The Southeast portion of the United States has the highest childhood obesity rates ever seen, probably because the deep fryer is so highly popular in that region, and are said to be most likely to be obese, while those in the West are said to most likely be thin.  Back in 1985, most states did not have date for obesity rates in children, but those who did had small percentages.  About 13 states had obesity rates among children of less than 10% and only about eight states had rates between 10-14%.   In 1991, the lowest obesity rate for children were between 0-9.9% and were found in New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Montana, and Washington (all states in the West).  The highest rate in 1991 were between 15-19.9% and were only found in four states; Louisiana, Mississippi, West Virginia, and Michigan.  Almost 15 years later, in 2006 obesity rates among children rose dramatically.  The lowest obesity rate was 15-19.9% only found in one state, Colorado.  The highest rate for obesity in children was above 30%, also only found in one state, Mississippi.  In 2007, about half of the Southeastern states had obesity rates for children above 30%. Currently, almost all the Southeastern states have rates about 30%.  Since the later 1900’s, each state has had dramatic increases in childhood obesity, some states more than others, and the rates will only keep increasing throughout the future.

                Childhood obesity rates have dramatically increased since the 1980’s.  Since then, there have been many factors that contribute to the rise in obesity in children.   Genetics, technology advances, and culture and society changes are just a few aspects that have pushed obesity rates in children to escalate.  Childhood obesity rates have increased by 13.1% in 28 years; imagine how high the rates will be in another 28 years.  Childhood obesity is very serious disease that everyone should be aware of.  Currently, this could be a problem for our family members or our future children and grandchildren.  Childhood obesity rates need to be slowed down or death rates among obese children will continue to increase. 

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Childhood Obesity Facts. 15 Sept. 2011. 20 Sept. 2011.

<http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/>

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Obesity and Overweight: Data and Statistics. 21 April 2011. 20 Sept. 2011

<http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/data.html>

 

Stein, Sara. On Childhood Obesity and Genetics – It’s All In The Family. 9 Feb. 2010. 20 Sept. 2011

<http://obesefromtheheart.com/2010/on-childhood-obesity-and-genetics/>

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overweight and Obesity: Causes and Consequences. 16 May 2011. 20 Sept. 2011

<http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/causes/index.html>

 

USA Today. Obesity Rates Climb in Most States. 2011. 20 Sept 2011.

<http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-08-27-obesity-rates_N.htm>

 

Nation Master. Health Statistics: Obesity by Country. 2011. 20 Sept. 2011.

<http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/hea_obe-health-obesity>

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. US Obesity Trends. 21 July 2011. 20 Sept. 2011

<http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html>

Rough Draft – Paper 1

September 20, 2011 at 9:21 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Childhood Obesity: How did it come about?

 

                In my junior year of high school, I was sitting in my health class staring off into space when my teacher told us that we were going to start a movie.  At that second I came back from cloud nine and was excited to watch a movie instead of listen to her lecture.  The movie she put in was called “Supersize Me”.  After the video was finished, I had a new outlook on obesity.  After watching that movie, I started asking questions about obesity; how did it start? Why has it been such a problem?  Then, I started thinking about how children could become obese and how this “epidemic” of childhood obesity came about.  Childhood obesity is defined as children who have an excess amount of fat.  More and more children are consuming more calories than they are burning off.  Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the past 30 years.  About 17% (12.5 million) of children and adolescents (between the ages of 2-19) are obese in America. The obesity rate among children between the ages of six and 11 has increased from 6.5% in 1980 to 19.6% in 2008 and the rate among adolescents between the ages of 12 to 19 has increased from 5.0% to 18.1%.  These rates have increased by exactly 13.1% in 28 years!   These large increasing statistics have brought the attention of many individuals to realize that childhood obesity is a serious problem and that the numbers keep rising.  With these increasing numbers, we can’t help but ask why and what happened since the 1980’s that have caused this significant increase in childhood obesity rates.

                Since the late 1900’s, childhood obesity rates have dramatically increased and scientists, dieticians, and many other people can’t help but wonder why in that specific time period did rates start to increase. There are many causes of children who are obese.  One cause that some children cannot fix is that obesity is genetic.  Although obesity can be genetic, it is very rare that certain genes link obesityfrom the parents to their own children.  Only about one in 7,000 children can say that they are obese because of their genes.  Those few children who can say they are obese because of genetics are said to have a disorder, such as Bardet-Biedl or Prader-Willi syndrome.  Both of these disorders are caused by the variation or depletion of certain genes in certain chromosomes and one of the effects of these syndromes is obesity.  These syndromes are hereditary and will be passed on from generation to generation. 

Other than genetics, the question still arises about why childhood obesity has increased so much since the late 1900’s.  One answer to this question is because of the television.  TV became very popular in the 1960’s because more channels were created that contained news, sports, sitcoms, and much more.  Although TV’s became popular in the 1960’s, they were quite expensive during that era.  A decade or so later, TV’s became less expensive and more people started to buy them.  With almost everyone having TV’s in the 1980’s, more and more children became less active because all they wanted to do was sit and watch TV with their friends.  Less activity leads to fewer calories burned, which is turn could cause obesity among children.  Other technology devices such as computers, video games, Xbox’s, and cell phones all can contribute to the increase in obesity.  More children are becoming attached to computers, games on computers, all sorts of video games, and cell phones which leads to less activity every day.  Not only is a decrease in activity a huge part of childhood obesity, but the rise in high caloric foods is also a major attribution. Many fast food restaurants were booming in the 1980’s and have grown ever since.  In the late 1900’s, fast food restaurants were competing between each other (this was known as the “burger wars”) and they all started to increase their locations and lower the prices on their menus so more people would come to their restaurant, instead of going to other fast food restaurants.  Fast food restaurants also enlarged their portion sizes, so people would consume morecalories each meal.  In addition to the escalation of caloric intake, there are many other factors that contribute to the rise of obesity since the late 1900’s.

Culture and society have a large part in childhood obesity. Throughout the past 30 years, women have become a huge asset in the work force.  Nowadays, with most families having a working mother and father, there is limited time to prepare dinner for the family and it has become easier to just go out to eat or to go through a drive-through on the way home from work.  In other words, non-healthy foods are the easy way to feed a family.  Not only do some parents not have time to prepare meals, healthy food prices have gone up as the prices for non-healthy foods have gone down.  Some parents cannot afford to give their children the healthy foods and nutrients they need, which could result in the increase in weight, and possibly obesity.  Another cultural aspect of childhood obesity is schools and education.  Since the late 1900’s, more schools have focused mostly on academics instead of physical activity.  Schools have decreased their physical education and health classes and exchanged them for more reading or math classes.  Since the 1980’s, there have been many changes in society, some for the good and some the bad, and some of these changes have an influence on children and how they take care of their bodies.  As society continues to become more advanced, there will be a continuing number of children who are becoming obese.  After discussing many factors that have caused an increase in childhood obesity since the late 1900’s, we can’t help but ask where childhood obesity has been a problem in the United States.

Currently, out of the top 28 countries, the United States is first with the highest percentage of children who are obese.  The United States is followed by Mexico, and in third is the United Kingdom.  The Southeast portion of the United States has the highest childhood obesity rates ever seen and aresaid to be most likely to be obese, while those in the West are said to most likely be thin.  Back in 1985, most states did not have date for obesity rates in children, but those who did had small percentages.  About 13 states had obesity rates among children of less than 10% and only about eight states had rates between 10-14%.   In 1991, the lowest obesity rate for children were between 0-9.9% and were found in New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Montana, and Washington (all states in the West).  The highest rate in 1991 were between 15-19.9% and were only found in four states; Louisiana, Mississippi, West Virginia, and Michigan.  Almost 15 years later, in 2006 obesity rates among children rose dramatically.  The lowest obesity rate was 15.19.9% only found in one state, Colorado.  The highest rate for obesity in children was above 30%, also only found in one state, Mississippi.  In 2007, about half of the Southeastern states had obesity rates for children above 30%. Currently, almost all the Southeastern states have rates about 30%.  Since the later 1900’s, each state has had dramatic increases in childhood obesity, some states more than others, and the rates will only keep increasing throughout the future.

                Childhood obesity rates have dramatically increased since the 1980’s.  Since then, there have been many factors that contribute to the rise in obesity in children.   Genetics, technology advances, and culture and society changes are just a few aspects that have pushed obesity rates in children to escalate.  Childhood obesity rates have increased by 13.1% in 28 years; imagine how high the rates will be in another 28 years.  Childhood obesity is very serious disease that everyone should be aware of.  Currently, this could be a problem for our family members or our future children and grandchildren.  Childhood obesity rates need to be slowed down or death rates among obese children will continue to increase.

Background Info.

September 15, 2011 at 2:39 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
  • Who – Childhood obesity has more than tripled in the past 30 years.  More and more children are consuming more calories than they are burning off.  About 17% (12.5 million) of children and adolescents (between the ages of 2-19) are obese in America.  The obesity rate among children between the ages of six and 11 has increased from 6.5% in 1980 to 19.6% in 2008. The rate among adolescents between the ages of 12 to 19 has increased from 5.0% to 18.1%. These large increasing statistics have brought the attention of many individuals to realize that childhood obesity is a serious problem and that the numbers keep rising.

http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/obesity/

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/data.html

  • What – There were many causes to the large increase in children who are obese.  One cause of childhood obesity that some children cannot fix is that it is genetic.  Now, only about one in 7,000 children can say that; genes linking obesity from parents to children are very rare.  Those few children who are obese because of genetics are said to have a disorder such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. (research Bardet-Biedl and Prader Willi to see if they are legit).  Other than the children who are obese because of genetics, what are the causes of obesity for the other children?  Advertisements of less healthy foods (always seeing mcdonalds, burger king, pizza, etc. commercials), lack of physical activity in schools, not many safe or appealing places to play in cities or communities, increased portion size, television and gaming systems, limited access to healthy foods.

http://obesefromtheheart.com/2010/on-childhood-obesity-and-genetics/

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/causes/index.html

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/problem.html

  • When – When did obesity start to be such a problem (are as some call it, an epidemic)? Most families now have a working father and mother, which creates for less time to prepare dinner and it has become “easier” to just go get fast food. Also, parents do not eat as healthy as they should and in turn, children are copying what their parents do and eat whatever they want. Childhood obesity was not considered an “epidemic” until recently.  Rates of obese children have risen in the past thirty years primarily because of cultural change.  With the rise in fast food restaurants appearing on almost every block and with children becoming lazier and lazier due to television and new gaming systems, children do not get the physical exercise they used to.  

http://www.baptistonline.org/health/healthieryou/child/Childhood_Obesity_Epidemic.asp

http://www.helpcurechildobesity.com/child-obesity-causes.html

  • Where – where is childhood obesity the biggest problem in the US and why?  Children living in the Southeast of the US are said to be the most likely to be obese, while those in the West are most likely to be thin.  In 1991, the highest obesity rates were between 15-19.9% found in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, West Virginia, and Michigan. In 2006, the highest obesity rate was above 30% and that was only found in Mississippi.  The childhood obesity rates increased in almost every state from 1991 to 2006, imagine what it would be now.  In 2006, Mississippi was the “fattest state” in the US, with surrounding states such as Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, and Arkansas in a close second with rates between 25-29.9%.  

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Obesity/19899

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-08-27-obesity-rates_N.htm

http://healthyamericans.org/reports/obesity2010/

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html

http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/hea_obe-health-obesity

  • What to do next?  I feel like I need to research a little more about where childhood obesity is highest and still increasing (by state).  I also need to research the disorders Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome and find out more about those syndromes.

Research Project – URL’s,etc.

September 13, 2011 at 6:16 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

http://www.stop-childhood-obesity.com/childhood-obesity-statistics.html

http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/05/01/health/main507774.shtml

http://www.examiner.com/childhood-obesity-in-national/childhood-obesity-a-bit-of-history

http://www.onlineobesityhelp.com/history-of-obesity.html

 

 

Research Ouestion Brainstorming

September 13, 2011 at 2:32 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CHILDHOOD OBESITY

What do I already know?

-Childhood obesity has been on the rise for many years, but why?

-I know that many dietitians and others in the health profession are trying to figure out a way to decrease the number of obese children.

-Obesity can be genetic, but it also can be a choice that kids make (choosing to eat fast food, not exercising, etc.)

 

What do I need to find out?

-I need to find out why the number of obese children has been on a rise recently.

-I need to find out what was the start of childhood obesity (was it the increase in the number of fast food restaurants, etc.)

– Why is it still on the rise when children know the risks of being obese?

-Is childhood obesity mostly genetic or not?

 

So what?  Research Question

-What started the dramatic increase in childhood obesity and why?

-Why do the numbers of obese children keeping rising?

 

What else do I need to find out?

-Why is obesity dangerous to children?

-What are the different dangers in childhood obesity versus adult obesity?

Research Writing Library Search

September 8, 2011 at 6:10 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Books –

1. Use Pilot to find a book on your topic. – My topic is Penn State football.

2. Find the book on the shelf.

3. Write down the title of the first book on the left and the first book on the right of your book. – Left = Restoring the Pride – Penn States 2005 Championship Season. Right = For the Glory.

4. Check out some books.

Periodicals –

1. Find an article about your topic in a bound journal

2. Xerox the article.

Narrative

1. Write a short narrative about your experience completing this assignment.

 – I found this assignment to be extremely helpful in learning how to locate and use the resources the library provides us with.  It was a little nerve-racking at first because I had not used the libraries resources before, I had only been in the library to study a couple of times (I didn’t even know the library had an upstairs).  Not only did this assignment teach me how to use Pilot and find certain books on a specific topic, it also taught me how to use my resources and look up articles as well.  Although I could not find an article on my specific topic in a bound journal (Penn State football articles are easily found online, but not in bound journals, as I discovered), I found multiple articles on the Penn State Agriculture Department (one of the best in the state).  Overall, I was a bit nervous about going into the library to actually use their resources and look up books and articles (which I had never done), but I am pleased that I learned how to use their resources for this class and others to come.

5 points for two Harry Potter articles

September 1, 2011 at 7:49 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The first article that was analyzed was “Vatican slams Harry Potter”.

1. “Young Christian minds will ‘lose the spirit of discernment between good and evil and that they will not have the necessary strength and knowledge to withstand the temptations to evil,’ Ratzinger wrote…” – I picked this line for two reasons.  First, it is an emotional persuation to the readers that young Christians are at risk when reading the Harry Potter series.  Many people do not agree with that statement and think Harry Potter is perfectly fine for young people to read.  Second, the quote in the middle of the statement was by Ratzinger.  Who exactly is this Ratzinger? Can he be trusted?  Ratzinger is a Cardnial in the Catholic Church and is someone who can be trusted – he is a credible source. (Pathos)

2. “…headlining an article by an expert in English literature who calls the teen wizard “the wrong kind of hero”. – This “expert” in English literature is stating their emotional opinion on Potter in the books, calling Harry “the wrong kind of hero”.  Some other people may not agree with this statement. (Pathos)

3. “…Edoardo Rialti writes about the harmful effects of the “half-truth” messages presented by JK Rowling in the Potter saga.” – I believe that this statement is factual and emotional.  Rialti states his emotional opinion on the half-truth messages in the series, but it is a fact that the Harry Potter series displays half-truth messages to people. For example, the wizards in the school can use major to lift things up from their desk; this cannot happen in real life but a student can pick something off their desk if they wanted it to be moved – magic is not real.

4. “… Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who voiced fears in 2003 that the “subtle seductions” contained in the Potter series could “corrupt the Christian faith” in impressionable young children.” – this is an emotional appeal stating a view point that the series could corrupt the Christian minds of young children.  Ratzinger is trying to protect the minds of the young children who want to read these books. (Pathos)

5. “In Rowling’s stories ‘we are told that, at the end, some things are not bad in themselves, if used for a good purpose: violence becomes good, if in the right hands and [used by] the right people, and maybe in the right dose.’ ” – this is factual information because it is describing the purpose for everything at the end of the book.

The second article was “Harry Potter and the incredible positive review from the official Vatican paper”

1.”The Catholic Church has heaped praise on the latest ‘Harry Potter’ film after previously accusing the books of promoting witchcraft and the occult”. – this is factual information because it expresses how the Catholic Church felt after watching the latest Harry Potter movie and changing their minds after accusations. Since the Catholic Church “approved” the movies, to some people it may seem that the movies are okay now because the Catholic Church approved them.

2. “The paper also praised the film’s clear message that ‘the search for immortality epitomised by Lord Voldemort ‘was wrong”. – this is factual and credible information because it is stating that the movies have a clear message that the search for immortality epitomised by Lord Voldemort was wrong.  The movies have a clear definition of what is right and what is wrong.

3. “The Vatican’s official newspaper lauded ‘Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince’ for its “clear” depiction of the eternal battle between good and evil represented by the struggle between Harry and his nemesis, evil sorcerer Lord Voldemort”. – this is a fact because it’s saying that there is a clear line drawn between good (Harry) and evil (Lord Voldemort) and is easy to pick up so people and young children do not get confused between the two.

4. “It even approved of the film’s treatment of adolescent romance amid the halls and corridors of Hogwart’s, saying that it achieved the “correct balance” and made the teenage stars more credible.” – this is stating that there is now a correct balance in the movies and they are now agreeing with the movie.

5. ” ‘L’Osservatore Romano’ said the movie was the best adaptation yet of the JK Rowling books, describing it as ‘a mixture of supernatural suspense and romance which reaches the right balance’. ” –  ‘L’Osservatore Romano’ is the Vaticans official newspaper – can this source be trusted with its opinion on the right balance for the romance?  Sometimes it is hard to decide what is a reliable source and what isn’t.

Hello world!

August 30, 2011 at 2:12 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Welcome to WordPress.com. After you read this, you should delete and write your own post, with a new title above. Or hit Add New on the left (of the admin dashboard) to start a fresh post.

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